Broken Record Ziggy Marley Reminisces About Jamaica and His Father

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Malcolm Gladwell recently spoke with Ziggy Marley as part of the Live Talks Los Angeles series. Their conversation centers around a book of photographs Ziggy curated called Bob Marley: Portrait of the Legend. Ziggy has gone on to become a reggae icon in his own right and is now an eight-time Grammy winner, a philanthropist, author and keeper of his dad’s legacy along with the rest of the Marley family. Today we’ll hear Malcolm and Ziggy talk about the turbulence in ’70s Jamaica caused by two opposing political parties. Ziggy also recalls the night gunmen ambushed the Marley house, shooting his mother and Bob—both whom thankfully survived. And Ziggy answers the question we all want to know: was the famously soccer-obsessed Bob Marley really any good on the field.

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You can find the playlist for this episode HERE — enjoy!

The Hosts

Rick Rubin

In addition to being a podcast host, Frederick Jay “Rick” Rubin is an American record producer and former co-president of Columbia Records. Along with Russell Simmons, he is the co-founder…

Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell is president and co-founder of Pushkin Industries. He is a journalist, a speaker, and the author of six New York Times bestsellers including The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers,…

Justin Richmond

Justin Richmond is producer and co-host of the music podcast Broken Record with writer Malcolm Gladwell, New York Times editor Bruce Headlam, and music producer—and Def Jam co-founder—Rick Rubin. Justin…

Bruce Headlam

Bruce Headlam is one of the co-creators of the music podcast Broken Record. He worked at The New York Times for 19 years, including two years running the 50-person Video…